Hobellinie Van Roje, planing line, ligne de rabotage

Flexibles Hobeln kleiner Chargen bis 8 m Länge EN Flexible planing of small batches up to 8 m in length

Holzwerke van Roje installs a new planing mill in its existing facility at the Oberhonnefeld-Gierend location (Rhineland-Palatinate).

Holzwerke van Roje strengthened its own finishing with the installation of an automated planing mill last year. Connected to the sawmill, around 50% of the main product is processed further here. The company invested around 3.7 million euro for this purpose in the new plants.

Satisfied with the cooperation and results of the project (from left): Planing Mill Manager Eduard Dück, the Managing Director of Holzwerke van Roje, Gerhard Hauschulte and Kallfass Director Hans Haist.

Holzwerke van Roje GmbH & Co. KG operates a sawmill at its Oberhonnefeld-Gierend location (Rhineland-Palatinate) with an annual timber output of around 450,000 solid cubic metres. 90 % spruce and 10 % Douglas fir are currently processed, but Managing Director Gerhard Hauschulte estimates that pine will be added to this again to ensure the availability of timber logs in future. A planing mill and pellet production facility producing 80 000 t per annum are attached to the saw mill, and a cross-laminated timber production facility is currently under construction. Holzwerke van Roje currently has a workforce numbering 160 employees.

The planing mill was completed last year as a completely new installation at the plant and adapted to meet the special needs of sawmill production. The objective is to clearly strengthen processing of sawn timber. Up to 70,000 m³ of planed workpieces will be produced per annum from the main product, which is equivalent to about 50 % of the main product produced in the sawmill.

Kallfass GmbH in Baiersbronn delivered the complete fully automated mechanisation technology for the new Rex “Big Master” planing machine from Georg Schwarzbeck GmbH & Co KG in Pinneberg, including a wrapping station. A cupping and moisture meter, a “Golden Eye” quality scanner from Microtec, a marking station from REA JET and the strapping unit from Fromm are integrated in this facility.

Hobeleinzug, Planer Infeed, chargement de raboteuses

Kallfass planing machine feeder

Einzug REX Big Master Hobelmaschine

Infeed side of the REX “Big Master” planing machine

During conversion planning in April 2020, the two existing planing lines were dismantled in June of last year. Kallfass began at this time to install parts of the mechanisation technology in cleared areas of the facility while production was still underway. Commissioning of the complete plant then followed at the beginning of September. The plant was producing around 400 m³ of planed workpieces a day in 2 shifts by the end of the year.

Production at the van Roje sawmill is very customer-oriented, serving buyers all over Europe. There is a focus on markets in the Netherlands and United Kingdom with the majority of orders for lengths exceeding 6 m. Van Roje has also concentrated on the European market in recent years, exploiting domestic sales opportunities freed through the booming US sawn timber market. Stock dimensions up to 620 mm and log lengths of 3 to 14 m are cut. The maximum length in the timber sorting system is 8 m. Frequent product changes of up to four times an hour are part of everyday production at van Roje. This means that, when it comes to the cross section and length, a broad variety of dimensions is encountered in the planing mill, and it is necessary to work with relatively small batches. The smallest batches frequently involve only two packages per dimension. The planing mill therefore needs to be very flexible and produce everything from roofing battens with numerous special dimensions to raw solid structural timber. The maximum dimensions of completely planed products at van Roje are 150 x 320 mm. In particular, the maximum possible length of up to 8 m means the plant differs from the majority of industrial planing mills.

Minimum adjustment times and “profile management” on the planing machine

The flexibility required at van Roje is reflected in the configuration of the Rex “Big Master” planing machine: With ten planing cutterheads (four horizontal and two vertical tools and four individual chamfering tools for an all-round workpiece chamfer) finished product widths of 60 to 400 mm and heights of 15 to 200 mm can be created with continuously adjustable feeds of 30 to 150 m/min. In addition to planing and profiling, single and multiple cutting to length of the workpiece is also possible, and van Roje uses up to five saws.

Different board widths can be processed in layers simultaneously on the machine with only narrow gaps between them. Width adjustment is servo controlled at an adjusting speed of 20 mm/s. The Rex profile management control system enables storing of working shaft positions which have been configured. If a particular profile needs to be repeated, the operator, after deploying the required tools, can select the profile using the assigned workpiece name. The machine then automatically moves each spindle into the correct position. Shafts not required for a procedure go into idle mode, leading to a palpable reduction in the electric power input.

Hobelline, Planing line, ligne de rabotage

Schematic depiction of the van Roje planing mill. The material moves from charging and tilt destacking via a sorting conveyor to the Kallfass planing machine feeder. A triple cross-cut saw is installed upstream. A Microtec quality scanner (1) is installed behind the Rex planing machine. Options then available are a bundling station (2) and marking station (3), after which the product is transferred to the wrapping and strapping station (6) by one of the two stackers (4 and 5). The packages are output to the right onto the acceptance point in front of the plant (7). Ejection of material from the sorting conveyor is possible (8).

Compact mechanisation for workpiece lengths up to 8 m

Kallfass installed a fully automated mechanisation solution here with an interface connection to the van Roje ERP system (Timbertec). With regard to operation of the planing mill, aside from the plant operator and a stand-in, only two other employees are required for wrapping.

Following tilt destacking of the raw material packages (presorted in the sawmill in the case of freshly cut material) and separating, unsuitable material can still be ejected from the sorting conveyor prior to planing machine charging. The plant can therefore also be used for stacking of drying packages. A growth ring detector (cupping detector) integrated on the unscrambler and a moisture meter from Microtec combined with a board turner contribute to the improvement of planing quality. Timber that is too moist can be ejected and raw material turned, depending on the growth ring position.

A freely positionable triple cross-cut saw is installed upstream of the planing feeder and frequently used at van Roje. Cutting upstream of the planing machine achieves absolutely fringe-free cuttings. The feeding of the planing machine achieves 50 cycles/min. Directly downstream of the planing machine, the workpieces pass through a “Golden Eye” scanner from Microtec that organises the product into strength classes C16 and C24. They can then be separated from each other in the passage and either sent directly to one of the two stackers or, previously, to a bundling unit. Adaptation of CE certification for mechanical sorting is currently underway at van Roje. The customer can therefore be offered a combination of mechanically and visually sorted planed workpieces.

Four strapping stations are available at the bundling unit. Up to ten stick bundles can be created there every minute. Packages can be produced on stackers equipped with stick magazines at a rate of 10 layers/min.

Flexibility and rapid dimension changes are core requirements of mechanisation at van Roje, given the frequent product changes involved. A dimension change upstream of the planing machine takes around 1 minute under practical conditions and 20 seconds downstream of the planing machine, meaning each dimension change takes a total of 1 to 2 minutes. The entire mechanisation is designed to provide a feed of 200 m/min. The compact mechanisation layout can accommodate timber lengths of 8 m with ease, while the minimum length for raw material is 2.00 m and 1.80 m for planed products. Package lengths up to 8 m can also be wrapped on the package wrapping unit.

CLT marketing from May

The planing mill is not only designed for finishing the main product, but also represents an important downstream production section for the cross-laminated timber production facility under construction. B sorters for lamellas originally created in the sawmill for other products are calibrated and quality sorted here for use as top layer lamellas in cross-laminated timber (CLT). Lamellas cut especially for the top layer in the sawmill are planed directly in the cross-laminated timber plant. Raw lamellas created from side products are planed and quality sorted for use as (non-dovetailed) transverse layers in the CLT. The option to create different board widths in a layer on the planing machine really pays off here. Exploitation of side products can therefore be considerably increased.

When compared to the usual contemporary production process in CLT manufacturing, the entire production process is to be optimised for resource efficiency, from production of raw lamellas in the sawmill to the completed CLT construction element. Particular attention is also paid to the conservation of raw materials in the cross-laminated timber plant (which bears the project name “Cross Works”). Window and door cutouts are returned to the raw materials cycle again through a treatment process. The cutouts created are separated and recycled in the cross layer. These efforts to achieve resource efficiency have also encouraged support of the overall project through funding of EUR 5,993,815 from the environmental innovation programme of the German Federal Ministry of the Environment. 75,000 m³ CLT should be manufactured annually as of April in 2-shift operation. van Roje wants to begin marketing its cross-laminated timber in May.

Hobeleinzug, Planer Infeed, chargement de raboteuses

Kallfass planing machine feeder

Einzug REX Big Master Hobelmaschine

Infeed side of the REX “Big Master” planing machine

Hobelline, Planing line, ligne de rabotage

Schematic depiction of the van Roje planing mill.

Kippentstapelung, tilt destacking, dépilage par renversement

Charging and tilt destacking from Kallfass.

Bündelung, bundling, bottelage

The view into the front part of the van Roje planing mill facility. The bundling unit is in the foreground, with the feed for the first stacker behind. Visible in the background are (from the right) the sharpening center, the noice-protection cabin of the planing machine and the “Golden Eye” scanner.

Bündelung und Stapler, bundling and stacking, bottelage et empilage

The rear part of the facility, with the bundling unit in the foreground again and the line with the second stacker behind.

Graphics: Kallfass / Images and text: J. Härer, Holz-Zentralblatt

Holz-Zentralblatt Nr. 3/2022

Visuelle Qualitätskontrolle von Schnittholz, visual quality control of sawn wood

Für alle Dimensionen gerüstet EN Equipped for every dimension

Planing unit no. 5 has been in operation at Rettenmeier Holzindustrie in Ramstein, Germany since April. During the design phase, those responsible placed enormous importance on achieving a high level of flexibility, as Rettenmeier specialises in particular in supplying DIY stores.

The goal of Rettenmeier Holzindustrie is to increase added value in the company. “That’s why we invested in a further planing line in Ramstein”, explained Rettenmeier CEO Dr. Stephan Lang. He indicated that timber production in Ramstein is 600,000 solid cubic metres per annum in two shifts. The capacity of the planing units is about 200,000 m³ per annum. The sawmill group distributes around 35 % of the products it produces in the DIY sector. 35 % goes to the specialist German and international trade, 20 % to the industry and packaging sector and 10 % involves sawmill by-products.

Hobeleinzug, feeding of planers

Rettenmeier CEO Dr. Stephan Lang and Kallfass Managing Director Hans Haist (from l.) in front of the planing machine feeder.

Rapid output achievement

Those responsible primarily focused on flexibility and, simultaneously, a high level of availability with regard to the new planing line. For this reason, mechanisation was entrusted to Kallfass in Baiersbronn-Klosterreichenbach, Germany. “We knew Kallfass would supply the solution we wanted”, Lang emphasised. The mechanisation specialist had already converted an existing planing line in Ramstein, and this worked out perfectly. In retrospect, Lang is more than satisfied with handling of the project. “I’ve rarely experienced such a perfect commissioning. We achieved almost 100 % output after four weeks, and 6000 m³ of battens had already been bundled in this period. If we had to, we’d construct the plant in the same manner again”.
Kallfass adapted the new planing line to fit an existing facility exactly. The plant can process lengths ranging from 2 to 5 m, widths of 60 to 300 mm and thicknesses of 14 to 120 mm. Issues relating to available space mean the vacuum lifting device destacks the dried timber packages in layers. A stick stripper brushes the stacking strips down and conveyor systems collect these. An operator initially assesses the workpieces visually in the transverse transport. Following this, they are checked with a Brookhuis moisture measuring. “Unsuitable timbers can still be ejected here”, explained Kallfass Managing Director Hans Haist. Kallfass subsequently installed the longitudinal feed in the direction of the WJS planing machine. Depending on the timber length, this can achieve up to a maximum of 80 cycles a minute.

„Kallfass handled the entire project impeccably. We achieved almost 100 % output within four weeks.“

Dr. Stephan Lang, CEO of Rettenmeier Holzindustrie

Zwischenlagerung Schnittholz in Filmetagen, temporary storage of timber in film layers

Unsuitable dimensions can be stored temporarily onto a conveyor in film layers and then fed into the production process again.

Resorting for higher quality

There are two options downstream of the planing unit. Timbers that can be classified as a higher quality through cutting are sorted out to the left onto a conveyor in film layers. These can be fed into the process again if, for example, a dimension change occurs in the planing machine. “This resorting dispenses with the need for a further stacking system and complex trimmer station”, said Haist. The majority of planed workpieces are pulled onto a cross conveyor behind the conveyor with the temporarily stored film layers. An operator examines the workpieces here, ejects timber pieces of unsuitable quality and, by drawing on the timbers, can determine the chop cuts. In addition, Rettenmeier opted for a bundling system. In the case of single pieces, this simply involves “running over” these with transport chains. Kallfass also integrated a labelling system in this section. Kallfass was already involved in the development of this solution at Cordes, and it is also employed in Ramstein. “Both the bundles and wooden strips can be labelled”, explained Haist.

Following this, the timbers pass through the tried and trusted multiple cross-cut saw from Kallfass. The saw is equipped with four variable saw aggregates. The layers are then transferred to the stacking system which is equipped with magazines with automated stick placement. The stacker is also suitable for DIY packages (i.e. quarter packages). Finally, the finished packages are foil-wrapped and prepared for shipping. When it comes to foil wrapping, Kallfass provided yet another machine that mills the grooves in squared timbers. “This has proven its worth on numerous occasions”, said Haist.
“The new planing line allows us to achieve classic four-sided planing and, also, separation, or simply tongue and groove sections. That makes us extremely versatile. Kallfass provided us with a simple, but extremely efficient solution that allowed us to cover all requirements”, Lang confirmed.

Holzsortiment

Rettenmeier processes four types of timber in Ramstein (including Douglas fir) to create products for the construction industry and specialist trade.

Leistenabstreifung mit Leistenbesen, stick stripping with brush

Following destacking in layers with a vacuum lifter, a stick stripper brushes the stacking strips down.

Visuelle Qualitätskontrolle von Schnittholz, visual quality control of sawn wood

A worker examines the workpieces and can realise chop cuts by drawing on the timbers.

Bündelungsanlage, bundling unit

Kallfass also provided Rettenmeier with a bundling system complete with marking station…

Mehrfachablängsäge mit vier Sägen, multiple cross-cut saw with four trimmer saws

… and the tried and trusted multiple cross-cut saw with four saw aggregates.

Leistenmagazine zur Holzleistenlegung, stick placement via magazines

Hans Haist and Stephan Lang observe stick placement and the stacking of packages.

Images and text Martina Nöstler, Holzkurier

Holzkurier 38/2021

Etikettierung und Bündelung

Alle 50 Sekunden:
ein 4m-Paket EN
A 4 m package every 50 seconds

From S10 to KVH structural timber – planing, marking, labelling, bundling, foil wrapping, stacking of everything at up to 200 m/min

The extraordinary business success of Cordes Holz in Bremerhaven has compelled it to upgrade the planing unit after only two years. The plant was developed, expanded and modernised, and the result is a completely new Kallfass planing mill.

Kallfass had started the planing unit at Cordes Holz at the turn of the year 2018/2019. At that time, the line was, in essence, explicitly designed for DIY store products all over Europe. “The plant was extremely robust and very quick. In fact, it went so well that, despite our complete satisfaction, we were obliged to order an upgrade of the machine from Kallfass two years later”, explains Andreas Cordes, the owner. His primary wish was to enhance the level of flexibility with regard to dimensioning. And, while they were at it, they could also expand the marking options and, once again, increase the performance of the planing machine.

“The success of the machine forced us to upgrade after only two years”

Andreas Cordes

Takes on everything up to 290 mm and 6 m in length

What emerged was a universal plant that can do everything “from an S10 batten to raw solid structural timber, and from rhombic sections to square planing”, as Cordes describes it. That is considerably more products than could previously be manufactured. The maximum cross section is 290 mm by 165 mm and length of 6 m. Output was increased, despite comprehensive marking, labelling, foil wrapping, bundling and stacking options. The mechanisation is so powerful that the Rex Bigmaster could be enhanced from 100 to 200 m/min. The planing unit was designed for smaller solid structural timber cross sections, but it can now reach twice the speed and handle a much broader dimensional spectrum.

22 fitters for “open-heart surgery”

Kallfass realised the conversion during continuing operation. Up to 22 fitters were required to ensure that the general reconstruction could be achieved within ten weeks with only a single brief shutdown. “Actually, everything was changed, with the plant being expanded in three directions, and a lot of scanners, sensors and marking units were added”, explains Kallfass Project Manager Enrico Goldhahn. “It was open-heart surgery, and we performed it by working in two shifts, including over the weekend. We’re proud that, in spite of all the changes, hardly any stoppage occurred”.

Lagenweise Entstapelung, Leistenscanner mit Leistenabstreifung

There is a lot going on at the planing facility entrance: layer by layer separation, stick discharge, stick scanner, dimension check and feeding into the Bigmaster

Joint concept

“The plant, as it now exists, was a joint development undertaken by REA Jet, Cordes and us”, says Goldhahn. Among other things, he recommended that a buffer conveyor be installed upstream of the destacking device. The plant picks up an uninterrupted stream of packages for vacuum destacking. “We suggested here that a vacuum destacker with a hoisting unit, stick stripper and ATB stick scanner be selected, and that’s exactly how it was constructed”, relates Goldhahn.
At Cordes, timbers that are too short or unsuitable can be separated upstream of the planing unit. “It’s not unusual for a short piece to be delivered with a package, but I can do without that in the planing mill”, explains Cordes, which is also why a warping meter from ATB in Roggenburg, Germany and a turning device were installed here.

Powerful, despite many processing options and cutting

The first REA Jet labelling run then followed, printing all the required information on the DIY products. The downstream multiple cross-cut saw is from Kallfass. “We can now trim with millimetre accuracy. From 800 mm short timbers to 6 m excess lengths – that means we’re extremely flexible”, says Cordes with delight during the tour of the new planing mill.
He can also call up the plant performance data live on his mobile phone. During the on-site visit of the Holzkurier, a 4m DIY package was completed every 50 seconds.

Folierung, Umreifung, Paketzettel

Foil wrapping, strapping, packet note – everything compact

Six strapping units for small and large pieces

“We delivered the first plant to Cordes with six strapping machines for bundling small and large pieces”, continues Goldhahn. Finally, the packages can also be wrapped in foil. Kallfass also provided an offsetting station for quart packages. The stacking system can handle both small and large packages up to a package height of 2.4 m. “The automatic squared timber stacking is accelerated further, making everything perfect”, says Goldhahn, explaining the success.

Only two operators for the plant

Only two employees work in the plant on each shift. The team monitors the process and ensures that material such as labelling rolls is filled. Just how well the two work together became apparent during the visit. One of them focuses on feeding timber pieces up to the rear of the planing machine. A fault must be remedied here in the case of broken raw timber, or labelling rolls inserted. The second man stands beside the package assembly system. Bearers (squared timbers) or sticks are refilled there.

Praise from the biggest name in Germany

If Andreas Cordes accepts the plant by saying “We’re very satisfied”, his words carry weight. This is the judgement of a man whose corporate group includes German planing specialists such as Osmo Holz in Warendorf, Holz-Henkel in Göttingen and Krages Holzindustrie in Hamburg. In addition, Rettenmeier, a subsidiary, also creates planed workpieces at several locations. This means that the Cordes Group probably has the greatest planing capacity in Germany.

Cordes still has major plans for Bremerhaven. Solid structural timber will be increased to 200,000 m³ per annum, along with an additional 50,000 m³ a year of glued laminated timber. Kallfass is a significant partner for deliveries of these systems. A test run should commence this year.

Three stacks wait in front of the facility, with timber fed in automatically

Enrico Goldhahn und Andreas Cordes

Enrico Goldhahn and Andreas Cordes (from left): The Kallfass project manager and the Cordes Group owner

Hobelbeschickung mit Hochgeschwindigkeit

Enhanced planing unit: the Rex Bigmaster now runs at up to 200 m/min

Integrierte Etikettierung

Marking at full speed: units supplied by REA Jet

Millimetergenaue Kappung mit Mehrfachablängsäge

Trimming with millimetre accuracy, whether 80 cm short timbers or 290 mm solid structural timbers

Automatische Paket-Kantholzlegung

Automatic package squared timber stacking

Text and images: Gerd Ebner, Holzkurier
Holzkurier 26/2021

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kontinuierlicher Zufluss
mit Leistenroboter EN
Continuous inflow with stick robot

Handling of stacking sticks often appears to be something of a “side issue”. However, the Kallfass installation at the Sägewerk Egger sawmill in Brilon demonstrates the enormous workload reduction automatic feeding brings in packet assembly.

Several thousand stacking sticks need to be handled daily at the Sägewerk Egger sawmill in Brilon. “Previously, the continuous filling of stacking plant magazines during main and side board sorting was an enormously laborious task”, relates Jens-Michael von Werder who is responsible for production technology at the sawmill. Up to nine workers were involved in each shift, which meant a considerable number of personnel were working during three-shift operation. For this reason, it was decided to invest in an automated stick handling system with robot charging of magazines at Egger.

Flexible solution

“We found the standard variants available too rigid. We wanted a flexible solution which we could use to handle both drying chamber and stabilisation battens and squared timbers”, continues von Werder. Kallfass, Baiersbronn/DE, offered Egger the perfect solution. “We’d already gain a positive impression of Kallfass during a project in the planing mill. Aside from this, Kallfass has always proved to be a good partner when it came to tackling challenging tasks”, says von Werder. The mechanisation specialist presented those responsible at Egger with a flexible solution that appeared to offer them cutting-edge technology. “We had already installed other automated stick systems in the past, but the project at Egger in Brilon was the most comprehensive to date”, explains Kallfass Managing Director Hans Haist.

Geschäftsleitung Kallfass mit Projektleiter von Sägewerk Egger

In front of the sticks being fed in: Ernst Kallfass, Jens-Michael von Werder and Hans Haist (l. to r.)

Two lines, three robots

The “open-heart surgery”, as von Werder describes it, was performed from April to September, with Kallfass realising the entire automated stick line installation while plant operation continued. The actual installation took two months. “The project went very well and, most importantly, free of accidents. We had practically no downtimes”, confirms von Werder. Egger in Brilon cuts around 1 million m² per annum. The timber is sorted in main and side board plants which are installed in parallel. The new Kallfass line charges both plants with drying chamber and stabilisation battens and squared timbers. Stacking sticks from the dry sorting station are fed together with the squared timbers in uprights to the new Kallfass line. The uprights are discharged onto a buffer conveyor. The system automatically separates the squared timbers from the sticks. The squared timbers are then fed to a stacking system via a separate chain buffer line. The Kallfass control system assigns the squared timbers to both stacking plants based on package data. The sticks take another route, with the Kallfass mechanism separating these and feeding them through a scanner. This determines the dimensions and curvature. Unsuitable sticks are discharged through a flap. The system handles eleven sticks together in each case on an inclined conveyor.

“We anticipate the new stick handling system paying off within a very short space of time”.

Jens-Michael von Werder, responsible for production technology

Andrea, Hubertus and Paul

Andrea, the first robot on the line, grabs these eleven stacking sticks and cycles them into the buffer conveyor. “This is designed for around 3000 sticks”, explains Haist. Hubertus and Paul, the two other robots with swivel arms, pick up the stacking sticks if necessary and deposit them in the new Kallfass packet assembly magazines. “The system is designed for an output of 100 sticks per minute”, estimates Haist. “We hold the property rights to this robot charger”, he adds. There is only one stick length for all package widths in the case of stabilisation battens. These are adapted to the package through positioning and shifting of stick placement. “This solution means we are considerably more flexible than with different lengths, but the cost of materials is higher”, says von Werder. Kallfass also upgraded the stacker and delivered the entire control system over the course of this investment. This means that it is now possible to control the placement of more sticks in the lower five to six layers to prevent timber breakage. From Egger’s point of view, operation of the new stick handling system has been both smooth and absolutely satisfactory. “The goal in the area of stick handling is to now manage with four employees per shift. This means the investment will pay off within a very short space of time”, concludes von Werder.

Zuführung Stapelleisten in Richtung Scanner

Feeding the stacking sticks towards the scanner that determines the dimensions and curvature.

Leisteneintaktung Hauptware

… while "Hubertus" is responsible for the main board plant.

Zusammenfassung Leisten

The Kallfass system picks up eleven sticks in each case which are cycled onto the buffer conveyor by Andrea.

Leistenmagazine

Kallfass also upgraded the stacker during the course of the new system installation.

Befüllung Leistenmagazine mit Roboter

"Paul" grabs these sticks and fills the side board plant magazines with them …

Stapelpaket mit Stapelleisten

More stacking sticks can be placed in the lower five to six layers to prevent timber breakage.

Photos and text: Martina Nöstler, Holzkurier 51-52/2020